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Let's start at the very beginning /Do you have questions into the nature of the universe? Pose them here./ I can't.

“People of color [PoC] have the right to be angry that there has been yet another movie made that doesn’t even have one PoC in it. And they have the right to be vocal about it. One; because “Brave” is not a documentary and there is not a single good reason that every character is white and two; because they’re not wrong. It would have been more historically accurate if they had shown some PoC.”

Ghost-Plot, in response to concerns that PoC would be “out of place” in films like Brave.   (via racebending)

Posted 1 year ago With 180 notes

I know this may come as a shock but…

historicalslut:

The film wasn’t actually historically accurate.

People cannot actually turn into bears. There was no ancient bear living in Scotland who was going to destroy the royal family. There was no Princess Merida who doesn’t want to get married and stay single so she can let her hair flow through the wind as she rides through the land and fires arrows off into the sunset in Scottish history.The costumes were not even based on medieval clothes, they resemble Early Modern clothes more than Medieval clothes. Elinors dress was inspired by a dress created in the 19th century of Ellen Terry as Lady MacBeth. The scene were Elinor forced Merida into the tight corset? NEVER would have happened in Medieval Scotland or Europe. Also, Merida never would have gotten away with not being married. She would have been forced to be married, she was the princess after all.

Last but not least, the messages I have gotten of people whining “it’s historically inaccurate to put a POC in Brave” seriously needs to stop. Even if a POC never stepped foot in Scotland to this very day, there is NO reason for POC to not be in the movie. Period, end of discussion. As my friend, Liz, said, “I mean, some things need to be legit and like make sense to real life so that it’s grounded and not some crazy piece of surrealist art, but like putting people of color in there is not gonna be the straw that breaks the camel’s back. “So yeah, I suspended my disbelief that you can turn that chick into a bear, but a black person?! Woah, hold up you guys! That’s just too crazy! Totally breaks the facade!” For the love of all things good, if your only argument is “historical accuracy” you would be pointing out how most of the movie is historically inaccurate. It’s a fucking fantasy movie for Christ sake. However, your argument doesn’t hold up because you don’t give a flying fuck about historical accuracy. You are just pissed off someone called you out on your privilege and instead of admitting its fucked up there are no POC in the film, you make some bullshit excuse to make yourself feel better. Fucking stop.

Posted 1 year ago With 207 notes

176
jonathanbogart:

As an individual piece of filmmaking, Brave is almost entirely a success: gorgeous, well-made, exciting, funny, heartwarming, etc., with a fine story that both digs deep into traditional folk tales (Scottish and otherwise) and speaks to modern concerns; even if few of us are bound by ancient tradition to wed the scion of a warring clan, most of us have experience of being torn between the demands of those we love and our own desires.
As THE FIRST PIXAR MOVIE WITH A FEMALE PROTAGONIST, however, it’s a bit of a disappointment. It is, of course, exactly what you would expect a bunch of good-hearted male nerds with daughters to come up with: The Hero’s Journey, But For Girls! You can do anything you set your mind to, honey! Shoot, ride, swing swords! Adventure isn’t just for boys anymore!
But Pixar, especially lately, has trained me to expect better. Almost none of their previous movies can be boiled down to The Hero’s Journey (and the ones that can — the Cars movies — are generally agreed to be the worst of the lot). They’re stories about the social order (The Incredibles, A Bug’s Life, the Toy Story trilogy), about coping with loss (Finding Nemo, Up), about the artistic life (Ratatouille), about human destiny (Wall-E), about the wonder of imagination (Monsters, Inc., the Toy Story trilogy again), and (every single one of them), about establishing communitarian ties — about creating families out of what would otherwise be pretty sad and lonely individuals. 
So when THE FIRST PIXAR MOVIE WITH A FEMALE PROTAGONIST is instead about the pressures of already-extant family life — when the scope of the story is limited, in its essentials, to an intimate portrait of a specific mother-daughter relationship with no indication that anything but personal pride is ever really at stake — when, after all the shots have been fired and all the rides have been ridden and all the swords have been swung the world, the interpersonal relations, and the social order are exactly the same as they were when the story began, the underlying message is: you can shoot and ride and swing swords as much as you want, honey, but you’ll never escape the domestic sphere. Everything, in the end, comes down to how much you love your mother.
Looking broader than Pixar, this could be seen as a balancing of the scales for all the motherless-to-a-woman Disney Princesses. They, of course, were traditionally proscribed by the fairy tale form; and come to think of it, the sheer domesticity of the fairy tale, the one traditional form of European narrative that is allowed to have a female protagonist (other than the saint’s life) is striking; compare fairy tales to the extended romances written in the same centuries about Lancelot, Roland, El Cid — stories about empire and ambition and tragedy, rooted in history however fantastically arranged. (You can almost hear a fourteenth-century editor explaining patiently that men are just submitting more epic poems, and with greater confidence; the stories that nurses, mothers and grandmothers tell on the hearth are no doubt very good of their kind, but they’re not really what the National Ballad Awards were created to recognize.)
To boil it down even more: not a single other Pixar movie is about how its hero is male (or male-identified). None of them even spend any time thinking about it. This one is very much about how Merida is a girl. And while that is not at all surprising, it kind of sucks.
None of this is to be taken as suggesting that I didn’t enjoy the movie. I very much did. As someone who has taken twenty years to recover from the realization that his life was not going to fall automatically into the Hero’s Journey, I took great comfort in those familiar beats; and as someone whose first completed piece of prose narrative submitted for the approval of others featured a red-haired medieval Celtic princess who (I’m pretty sure) swung a sword once or twice, I took a very old satisfaction in the Gaelicisms of the voice acting, the set design, and the soundtrack. I’m well over it now (thank you, Internet), but it was not unpleasant to be reminded of  my fourteen-year-old self’s romantic fascination with all things Celtic for two hours.

Yes, all of this. I greatly enjoyed the movie. It was beautiful in both the content and the animation, and I’ll gladly watch it again and again. But that doesn’t mean it wasn’t problematic, and this is a very good explanation of what went wrong.

jonathanbogart:

As an individual piece of filmmaking, Brave is almost entirely a success: gorgeous, well-made, exciting, funny, heartwarming, etc., with a fine story that both digs deep into traditional folk tales (Scottish and otherwise) and speaks to modern concerns; even if few of us are bound by ancient tradition to wed the scion of a warring clan, most of us have experience of being torn between the demands of those we love and our own desires.

As THE FIRST PIXAR MOVIE WITH A FEMALE PROTAGONIST, however, it’s a bit of a disappointment. It is, of course, exactly what you would expect a bunch of good-hearted male nerds with daughters to come up with: The Hero’s Journey, But For Girls! You can do anything you set your mind to, honey! Shoot, ride, swing swords! Adventure isn’t just for boys anymore!

But Pixar, especially lately, has trained me to expect better. Almost none of their previous movies can be boiled down to The Hero’s Journey (and the ones that can — the Cars movies — are generally agreed to be the worst of the lot). They’re stories about the social order (The Incredibles, A Bug’s Life, the Toy Story trilogy), about coping with loss (Finding Nemo, Up), about the artistic life (Ratatouille), about human destiny (Wall-E), about the wonder of imagination (Monsters, Inc., the Toy Story trilogy again), and (every single one of them), about establishing communitarian ties — about creating families out of what would otherwise be pretty sad and lonely individuals

So when THE FIRST PIXAR MOVIE WITH A FEMALE PROTAGONIST is instead about the pressures of already-extant family life — when the scope of the story is limited, in its essentials, to an intimate portrait of a specific mother-daughter relationship with no indication that anything but personal pride is ever really at stake — when, after all the shots have been fired and all the rides have been ridden and all the swords have been swung the world, the interpersonal relations, and the social order are exactly the same as they were when the story began, the underlying message is: you can shoot and ride and swing swords as much as you want, honey, but you’ll never escape the domestic sphere. Everything, in the end, comes down to how much you love your mother.

Looking broader than Pixar, this could be seen as a balancing of the scales for all the motherless-to-a-woman Disney Princesses. They, of course, were traditionally proscribed by the fairy tale form; and come to think of it, the sheer domesticity of the fairy tale, the one traditional form of European narrative that is allowed to have a female protagonist (other than the saint’s life) is striking; compare fairy tales to the extended romances written in the same centuries about Lancelot, Roland, El Cid — stories about empire and ambition and tragedy, rooted in history however fantastically arranged. (You can almost hear a fourteenth-century editor explaining patiently that men are just submitting more epic poems, and with greater confidence; the stories that nurses, mothers and grandmothers tell on the hearth are no doubt very good of their kind, but they’re not really what the National Ballad Awards were created to recognize.)

To boil it down even more: not a single other Pixar movie is about how its hero is male (or male-identified). None of them even spend any time thinking about it. This one is very much about how Merida is a girl. And while that is not at all surprising, it kind of sucks.

None of this is to be taken as suggesting that I didn’t enjoy the movie. I very much did. As someone who has taken twenty years to recover from the realization that his life was not going to fall automatically into the Hero’s Journey, I took great comfort in those familiar beats; and as someone whose first completed piece of prose narrative submitted for the approval of others featured a red-haired medieval Celtic princess who (I’m pretty sure) swung a sword once or twice, I took a very old satisfaction in the Gaelicisms of the voice acting, the set design, and the soundtrack. I’m well over it now (thank you, Internet), but it was not unpleasant to be reminded of  my fourteen-year-old self’s romantic fascination with all things Celtic for two hours.

Yes, all of this. I greatly enjoyed the movie. It was beautiful in both the content and the animation, and I’ll gladly watch it again and again. But that doesn’t mean it wasn’t problematic, and this is a very good explanation of what went wrong.

Tagged: #brave

[photoset is five images of the new face character for Disney parks, Merida from Brave. She is wearing a dress that bears a passing resemblance to the movie, and has a wig of epic proportions.]

Hey, Merida, I like your new Irish dance wig. That’s pretty great. 

lyndez:

pixarmovies:

New Brave trailer!!!! The king is fantastic by the way! Can’t wait for June!

HNNNNG

Tagged: #Merida #Brave