the polite yeti

KEYBOARD SMASHING GOOD TIMES TO BE HAD BY ALL.

Please feel free to give me your money via etsy.

If you came for the alternative autism criteria, they are available here (revised version here).

Let's start at the very beginning /Do you have questions into the nature of the universe? Pose them here./ I can't.

1 of 4

So, according to your autism criteria, I think I have an ASD, but I don't know how to confirm this? Can you help? :/ I'm sorry to bother you!

@fallenspock

Nope, I can’t help you.

Posted 18 hours ago With 1 note

I read your autism criteria and I think I might have a milder form of autism?? They really helped but my therapist refuses to believe me because I talk well with adults (sometimes) and look people in the eye. Am I just projecting or is my therapist being close minded?

@librarytree

I have literally no idea.

I get asks like this a lot, and I’m really unclear why—do people think I’m a professional of some kind who can magically diagnose them on the internet? I’m just an autistic person who wrote a list of what I think are (most of) the major, important parts of being autistic that are recognizeable to other people. It’s great that the list has generated such interest and support from the community, but I am not a clinical researcher or diagnostician. 

Maybe your therapist is right. Maybe you are. I don’t know you, and even if I did I couldn’t offer a pocket diagnosis guide. If you’re in the US there is probably a good autism diagnostic clinic within your state. If you happen to be in North Carolina, I can thoroughly reccomend TEACCH. If you end up doing more research than glancing at an unverified list some weirdo on the internet typed up and continue to think autism may be a good descriptive fit for you and your neurology, talk to someone qualified to diagnose you. I’ve had some shitty therapists and psychiatrists try to give me terrible, bullshit reasons why I “can’t” be autistic because of prejudices they hold about what developmental disorders have to look like. Maybe you’ll never find someone to diagnose you, or you’ll decide you don’t want that. Self-dx has its place. But reading a checklist and then asking a complete stranger for a diagnosis is not going to work.

Posted 2 weeks ago With 2 notes

644

girljanitor:

deducecanoe:

goldenheartedrose:

yesthattoo:

deducecanoe:

goldenheartedrose:

bendingthewillow:

goldenheartedrose:

belligerentlypretentious:

i found this thing on pinterest and decided to caption it myself

Oh my Lord, this is the best thing ever.

Also, before anyone suggests that it’s making fun of Asperger’s (and autism) being a “real condition”, no, it’s probably not.  These kinds of charts tend to be very fear mongering pointless bullshit for parents to be fearful of their kid’s future.  

Basically these “symptoms” are more understandable if you understand the reason behind why we as autistic people do what we do.

So yes, I find humor in the fact that someone made their own AWESOME captions, because the original poster probably had disgustingly ableist ideas about autistic children.

Edited to add: the OP tagged this as actuallyautistic, which is a tag used by, incidentally, people who are actually autistic.  As the name implies.

I personally am very drawn to ‘OMG SALES’ and ‘lol bye’

And the “Attack on Titan” one.  Like ;lwkjer;lkjwe;lkjrel;kejwrlerwkj

I’m giggling so hard right now.  I’m adding this to my list of things to look at when I need a pick me up because oh man.

The third one is obviously the potty dance.

OMG it is the potty dance. People-induced potty dance? I know my bladder can’t hold as much when I’m stressed.

Could be that and the caption, because it certainly seems like both could be the case. I do, indeed, get people-induced stomachaches. But I also have experienced what you’re talking about, too.

I’m in my mid thirties and I still go to the bathroom to escape when everything is too much.

I vote for it’s the people-induced potty dance of “this person is really into this convo and I don’t know how to tell them I need to leave for peeing purposes”

Maybe I should just start randomly yelling OMG SALES and run away

Hi! I have a question about facial expressions & I hope it's okay if I ask. I'm visually impaired so I can't see faces well. Tried online tests but (A) I can zoom & the faces are super exaggerated or (B) I don't know the answer but there's options & when I read them I suddenly do. This isn't the only thing I relate to re autism but it was a pretty big one. What do you think? Does the fact that I can somehow figure them out negate everything else I relate to? Thank you.

@helena---x

Hi, I’m not sure if I’m the most qualified person to answer this, but I’ll give it a shot.

No person on the spectrum will have EVERY trait associated with the spectrum. A lot of traits associated with the spectrum can be paradoxical; for example, hyperlexia, dyslexia, and illiteracy are all associated with autism. So, sure, some of us may really struggle with reading body language or facial expressions, and that’s gotten fairly well known as an autism thing. But there are also plenty of people on the spectrum who don’t really struggle with these things—Kristina Chew’s son Charlie comes to mind. She’s not the only blogger and parent of an autistic kid who has commented that their child seems especially attuned to the mood in their home or school.

I think in a lot of cases it can also be a self-fulfilling sort of cycle: if I say I’m bad at reading facial expressions, I’m more likely to remember the times I messed up than all the times I didn’t. Also, expression and body language reading are skills and they can be learned. Autism may mean that it doesn’t come intuitively for a lot of us the way it might for allistic people, but it certainly doesn’t mean we’re incapable of learning!

So if you otherwise find that autism seems to describe your experiences, I don’t see why this should be a huge sticking point for anyone. What helped me learn about autsim the most was reading blogs by other people at various places on the spectrum, and blogs by parents of kids at various points on the spectrum as well (some of whom are spectrumy themselves!). If you’re not already, I’d highly reccomend reading Rachel Cohen-Rottenberg, the autism and empathy blog, the Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism (it can be a little parent-centric, but overall I think it’s well intended), Kassiane Sibley, Julia Bascomb, and plenty of others. 

Posted 2 months ago With 8 notes

women with systemising brain

yesthattoo:

logicalabsurdity:

autisticdrift:

No, just stop with the systemizing brain. This is a made up thing and it perpetuates stereotypes about both autism and gender. So, no.

Syste—whut?

It’s the Simon Baron-Cohen bullshit, men=systemizing, women=the other thing I’d recognize it if I saw it, maybe empathizing? Which is gender essentialist and bullshit. Most women came out systemizing by his test anyways.

And then he says autism=extreme male=extreme systemizing.

Yes, it’s as cissexist and gender essentialist as it sounds. One of his people, might have been him I don’t actually remember, actually suggested that some women might think they are trans men because of having autistic traits and therefore not fitting in as well with the women. So yeah, FUCK ALL OF THAT SHIT BECAUSE IT IS BIGOTED SHIT.

Posted 2 months ago With 36 notes

Revised alternative autism criteria

tiraspark:

politeyeti:

[snipped for length, post was the original and unedited aac]

So this shit is really really helpful for me to have and to explain what’s going on with my brain/life, but like, where is this from? It’d be helpful if I have a source (other than a tumblr blog haha) if I ever am able to bring it up to my brain lady.

It’s from my brain. I made it. The only source IS my tumblr blog (well, and my not-tumblr blog where I also posted it, alternatelexicon.com). Feel free to take them to your brain lady—at least a few people have, to my knowledge—but they are not scientifically validated (yet).

Posted 2 months ago With 616 notes

hedgehoglike:

This post is some personal observations I have made about people’s perceptions of The Autism Spectrum. When I refer to “people”, I don’t mean “all people”, I just mean the people I’ve encountered personally, whether in real life or talking to online.

When people first learn about autism, it’s because their new friend [be it a real person or a fictional character] has been described as “having autism”. These people, not really understanding what autism is yet, look at their friend’s characteristics and decide that all the traits they have are autism - that’s what autism is, it’s being like Sherlock, Abed Nadir, Einstein, that quiet kid in class, your friend’s nonverbal son. The stereotypes can be nice (look at all the aspergers characters in film, books and television, which paint most of them as eccentric, bad with people, but nevertheless geniuses) or they can be bad (like “Autism moms” complaining how difficult it is for THEM to raise their child… or Louis Theroux’ documentaries painting a bleak portrait of autism “sufferers”).

At this stage, the person learning about autism usually seems to think of it as a binary state… like a lightswitch. They’ll tell you you either HAVE AUTISM and are therefore exactly like the stereotype they’ve created (lights on) or you DON’T HAVE AUTISM because you’re not exactly like that stereotype (lights off).

If they’ve read up a little more, they might have seen the word “spectrum”. Now they have a more generalized view of autism. But they get the idea of “spectrum” wrong - they see it as a linear thing: a number-line, a scale, a dimmer switch or volume control, from Zero to Autistic — or from “low-functioning” to “high-functioning”. At that point they say silly things like “You’re very high-functioning!” or “No, but I mean like, the really really autistic kids, who, like, can’t do anything because they can’t talk”. They invent this linear relationship between a person’s verboseness and “how autistic they are”.

A lot of people seem to get stuck at this point, so I think the word “spectrum” requires some explanation.

When I see the word “spectrum” I immediately imagine a rainbow, or light being split from a prism. I’m sure most people do. And sure, the spectrum of colours is derived from the electromagnetic spectrum - we get different colours at different wavelengths - it’s a continuous range.

BUT- where does white light come from? White light is a combination of all those different wavelengths. You can create new colours by mixing different colours together. You can make colours brighter by adding a little bit of the other colours. You can mix the wavelengths together at different intensities. There’s a lot of ways of combining colours.

Which essentially what the autism spectrum REALLY is. Which is why labels like “high functioning” and “severely autistic” are dumb labels. Just because one autie excels at public speaking doesn’t make them unanimously “high functioning”. Conversely, I know of nonverbal auties who are masters of writing. To tell someone with a vibrant imagination, intense emotions, passionate interests and brilliant intellect that they’re “low-functioning” because they don’t vocalize their thoughts out loud is a massive insult. To refuse someone’s pleas of help because they’re “too high functioning” is also a shitty thing to do (I’m looking at you, ATOS).

There’s lots of ways in which we function, some of which are interdependent, others independent, and the levels vary wildly between autistic people, and they also vary wildly in non-autistic people too:

- Long-term memory

- Short-term memory

- Socializing

- Physical awareness

- Spatial awareness

- Vocal ability

- Verbal reasoning / ability to understand instructions

- Linguistic skills

- Mathematical and logical skills

- Executive function / Planning

- Ability to filter information

- Processing speed of sensory input

- Ability to focus / attention span

- Emotional self-awareness

[These might not be the exact distinct cognitive ‘functions’ as according to all the sciencey literature, this was verbatim]

I see my functions as a bar chart. In the version I drew it’s a prism splitting white light into the whole spectrum, but the different colours fade out at different places (and it’s a homage to Pink Floyd :p). That bar chart can vary throughout the day, be markedly different on different days, and is always changing over time.

In times of anxiety all the functionality unanimously drains out of me. In a nice chilled out environment it all comes trickling back.

When I’m in the zone doing something I enjoy, some of those rays of colour will be shooting off the image :D

(Note how there’s no lines on the image denoting the “average person“‘s ability towards a particular function, because this shit is nigh on impossible to quantify person-to-person. All you can do is compare yourself to yourself)

I think that’s more accurate than “low functioning” vs “high functioning” ??????????

Are you planning to write alternative autism criteria based on the new DSM-5?

@lechatelierite

Nope, the alternative criteria were written in direct response to the drafts of the DSM-5, and as far as I know nothing in their wording has changed. While I appreciate the simplicity they were aiming for, autism is a broad range of neurotypes and apparent symptoms, and I prefer a diagnostic tool that explicitly moves beyond stereotyped assumptions of what we behave like to the underlying experience of being autistic. There are lots of facets and most of us have some but not all. 

Also I made them up mostly for my own gratification. I’d love to have someone use them in a comparison study, especially with adults, but I don’t expect much more validation than I already have gotten. I’m glad they’re helpful to other people, especially people tentatively poking at self-dx.

Posted 6 months ago With 5 notes

paisleytie:

It really annoys me how, on the one hand, “autism experts” will complain about how autistic people are “rigid” and “inflexible,” but then they’ll turn around and tell us we need to rigidly and inflexibly follow the “social rules,” which they try to mislead us into believing are universal and unchanging. Oh, and then they’ll turn around again and complain about how we’re rigidly and inflexibly following the “social rules” that they told us to rigidly and inflexibly follow (and if we manage to be more flexible about the “social rules,” we’ll get in trouble for that, too — even though non-autistic people get away with being far more flexible about the “social rules” all the time).

Posted 1 year ago With 35 notes

Challenges of Autism Don’t Stop Woman From Doing Things That People Often Mistakenly Think Autistic People Can’t Do (Which is Why They Assume it’s Newsworthy)

paisleytie:

(I was inspired to write this “person with autism does something!” article parody after reading this article.)

A woman with a mild form of autism known as Asperger’s Syndrome doesn’t allow her diagnosis to get her down. She manages to post semi-regularly on her tumblr blog, an achievement that many consider a hallmark of being a high-functioning person with autism. It has been difficult to get to this point however.

“When I first encountered tumblr, I didn’t understand it,” she says, “People reblogging stuff and re-reblogging stuff? It made no sense.” The social world is often confusing for people on the autism spectrum. Her misunderstanding of tumblr is testament to her difficultly with “theory of mind.” She could not work out the thoughts of others and put herself in the place of other tumblr users to understand why they just kept reblogging and re-reblogging the same things, often using an animated gif as their only commentary. 

“We never thought she would get this far,” says her mother, who was inexplicably interviewed for an article that has nothing to do with her. She is clearly proud of her daughter, who consistently proves that she doesn’t let her autism define her or her abilities. “She can tie her shoes. She can pour herself a bowl of cereal in the morning. Sometimes, she even laughs at jokes.”

It may be the case that her autism could be a source of strength, too. Tumblr gives her an outlet for expressing her Special Interests. Many autism experts believe that people with autism develop Special Interests in order to make sense of a world that confuses them. Autism experts often assume that everything a person with autism does is done in order to make sense of a world that confuses them, even when it might look like they’re just doing it because it’s fun. Whatever the case, this tumblr-user with autism has used the blogging site to make use of her autistic strengths, as well as overcome her autistic difficulties.

Posted 1 year ago With 60 notes

sherlocksflataffect:

crown-of-weeds:

littlemissmutant:

A (non-disabled) dude in my abnormal psych class announced earnestly that he prefers the term “differently abled,” and everyone talking after him thus assumes that this is the best term and is going to town with it, argh.

1: Love that you’re liveblogging this.

2: WHAT THE HELL.

3: I take it social model 101 is not on the syllabus, then.

Sweet merciful fuck.

I don’t think any actually disabled people prefer that term. Calling me “differently abled” is fighting words.

Whyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy. Why. Why. Why. Why does he think he gets an opinion? Whhyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy.

Posted 1 year ago With 52 notes

paisleytie:

I love (and by “love,” I mean “hate”) when “autism experts” talk out of their butts and come up with completely contradictory “facts” about autistic people. For instance: autistic people are supposedly logical, but not emotional — when other people act in an illogical manner, or something happens that goes against their logical mindset, they get upset.

Hey wait.

But isn’t getting upset, oh, I don’t know…

…emotional?

Yeah.

Posted 1 year ago With 25 notes

234
[image is a pair of very pretty wood tunnels by Omerica, done with an Autism Speaks puzzle piece cutout]
fuckyeahstretchedears:

1-1/4” Missing Piece Tunnels

It makes my heart sad that a company that makes such astoundingly gorgeous jewelry promotes hate, but I guess we just have to get the message out more about A$.
Omerica: A$ are a hate group. I appreciate that you’re trying to do something good by supporting the largest organisation associated with autism in the US, but they actively silence voices of autistic people. We are not welcome in their organisation and the majority of their revenue goes towards research into preventing autism (which is eugenicist and not okay) and fear-mongering advertising to raise more money. Very little goes towards families and communities which could use assistance.
As an autistic person with mods, and someone who has been researching a lot about stretching of late, I could not support a company which donates to Autism Speaks, because you are donating towards my silence and the belief in my incompetance. I appreciate you want to do good. Alternate groups you might consider are the Autism Science Foundation, GRASP, or (my favourite) ASAN, the Autism Self-Advocacy Network. If you’d like more information about why Autism Speaks is harmful, feel free to check out the autism-related tags on my tumblr, including actuallyautistic. You’ll find plenty of information as well as links to more tumblrs and other sites explaining our issues with this hate group. Thanks.
PS - I’m not a puzzle, I’m a person. Puzzle related imagery associated with autism is offensive.

[image is a pair of very pretty wood tunnels by Omerica, done with an Autism Speaks puzzle piece cutout]

fuckyeahstretchedears:

1-1/4” Missing Piece Tunnels

It makes my heart sad that a company that makes such astoundingly gorgeous jewelry promotes hate, but I guess we just have to get the message out more about A$.

Omerica: A$ are a hate group. I appreciate that you’re trying to do something good by supporting the largest organisation associated with autism in the US, but they actively silence voices of autistic people. We are not welcome in their organisation and the majority of their revenue goes towards research into preventing autism (which is eugenicist and not okay) and fear-mongering advertising to raise more money. Very little goes towards families and communities which could use assistance.

As an autistic person with mods, and someone who has been researching a lot about stretching of late, I could not support a company which donates to Autism Speaks, because you are donating towards my silence and the belief in my incompetance. I appreciate you want to do good. Alternate groups you might consider are the Autism Science Foundation, GRASP, or (my favourite) ASAN, the Autism Self-Advocacy Network. If you’d like more information about why Autism Speaks is harmful, feel free to check out the autism-related tags on my tumblr, including actuallyautistic. You’ll find plenty of information as well as links to more tumblrs and other sites explaining our issues with this hate group. Thanks.

PS - I’m not a puzzle, I’m a person. Puzzle related imagery associated with autism is offensive.